Free Books About Pandemic & Contagion from Duke University Press 4.6 (5)

Contagious - cultures, carriers, and the outbreak narrative

From Duke University Press comes free books on pandemics and contagion. They write:

"Amid the worldwide spread of COVID-19, it’s a challenging time, and our thoughts are with those affected by this disease. In support and solidarity, we are providing free access to the following books and journal articles to help build knowledge and understanding of how we navigate the spread of communicable diseases."

Read moreFree Books About Pandemic & Contagion from Duke University Press 4.6 (5)

The First Eco-Warrior of Design 4.3 (4)

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the designs of William Morris – his trellises and willows and honeysuckles – are a little out-of-date and irrelevant. Popular designs like Strawberry Thief adorn cushions and mugs, but do they really fit the modern interior? Surprisingly, not only have these botanical themes made a massive comeback, but Morris himself has been enjoying a new wave of popularity – as an environmental prophet and anarchist.

Read moreThe First Eco-Warrior of Design 4.3 (4)

Watch a Short 1967 Film That Imagines How We’d Live in 1999: Online Learning, Electronic Shopping, Flat Screen TVs & Much More 4.6 (7)

Nobody uses the word computerized anymore. Its disappearance owes not to the end of computerization itself, but to the process’ near-completeness. Now that we all walk around with computers in our pockets (see also the fate of the word portable), we expect every aspect of life to involve computers in one way or another. But in 1967, the very idea of computers got people dreaming of the far-flung future, not least because most of them had never been near one, let alone brought one into their home. But for the Shore family, each and every phase of the day involves a computer: their “central home computer, which is secretary, librarian, banker, teacher, medical technician, bridge partner, and all-around servant in this house of tomorrow.”

Read moreWatch a Short 1967 Film That Imagines How We’d Live in 1999: Online Learning, Electronic Shopping, Flat Screen TVs & Much More 4.6 (7)

The Walkman’s Invention 40 Years Ago Launched a Cultural Revolution 4 (6)

In 1979, when Sony introduced the Walkman—a 14-ounce cassette player, blue and silver with buttons that made a satisfying chunk when pushed—even the engineers inside Sony weren’t impressed. It wasn’t particularly innovative; cassette players already existed, and so did headphones. Plus, the Walkman could only play back—it couldn’t record. Who was going to want a device like that?

Read moreThe Walkman’s Invention 40 Years Ago Launched a Cultural Revolution 4 (6)

Digital Nihilism on Tap: Download Nietzsche’s Major Works as Free eBooks 4.9 (7)

 

In times of deep distress I’ve often found the brutal, unsparing candor of Friedrich Nietzsche a strange comfort. While wholly enamored of the aristocratic, Hellenistic past of literary invention, the often bilious German philosopher nonetheless had no illusions about the nature of power, which does as it will and is not held in check by what we take for common values.

Read moreDigital Nihilism on Tap: Download Nietzsche’s Major Works as Free eBooks 4.9 (7)

Messaging App Telegram Moves to Protect Identity of Hong Kong Protesters 4.3 (4)

WASHINGTON—Telegram, a popular encrypted messaging app, will allow users to cloak their telephone numbers to safeguard Hong Kong protesters against monitoring by authorities, according to a person with direct knowledge of the effort.

The update to Telegram, planned for release over the next few days, will allow protesters to prevent mainland Chinese and Hong Kong authorities from discovering their identities in the app’s large group chats.

Read moreMessaging App Telegram Moves to Protect Identity of Hong Kong Protesters 4.3 (4)