Watch a Short 1967 Film That Imagines How We’d Live in 1999: Online Learning, Electronic Shopping, Flat Screen TVs & Much More

Nobody uses the word computerized anymore. Its disappearance owes not to the end of computerization itself, but to the process’ near-completeness. Now that we all walk around with computers in our pockets (see also the fate of the word portable), we expect every aspect of life to involve computers in one way or another. But in 1967, the very idea of computers got people dreaming of the far-flung future, not least because most of them had never been near one, let alone brought one into their home. But for the Shore family, each and every phase of the day involves a computer: their “central home computer, which is secretary, librarian, banker, teacher, medical technician, bridge partner, and all-around servant in this house of tomorrow.”

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The Walkman’s Invention 40 Years Ago Launched a Cultural Revolution

SONY Walkman

In 1979, the new device forever changed the way we listened to music. At the apex of the Walkman craze, 1987 to ’97, the number of people who reported that they walked for exercise rose by 30 percent. (ioulex)

In 1979, when Sony introduced the Walkman—a 14-ounce cassette player, blue and silver with buttons that made a satisfying chunk when pushed—even the engineers inside Sony weren’t impressed. It wasn’t particularly innovative; cassette players already existed, and so did headphones. Plus, the Walkman could only play back—it couldn’t record. Who was going to want a device like that?

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Digital Nihilism on Tap: Download Nietzsche’s Major Works as Free eBooks

Friedrich Nietzsche

In times of deep distress I’ve often found the brutal, unsparing candor of Friedrich Nietzsche a strange comfort. While wholly enamored of the aristocratic, Hellenistic past of literary invention, the often bilious German philosopher nonetheless had no illusions about the nature of power, which does as it will and is not held in check by what we take for common values.

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Messaging App Telegram Moves to Protect Identity of Hong Kong Protesters

Protesters check their phones

Protesters check their phones as they take part in a protest inside the Yuen Long MTR station, the scene of an attack by suspected triad gang members a month ago, in Yuen Long, New Territories, Hong Kong, China on Aug. 21, 2019. (Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

WASHINGTON—Telegram, a popular encrypted messaging app, will allow users to cloak their telephone numbers to safeguard Hong Kong protesters against monitoring by authorities, according to a person with direct knowledge of the effort.

The update to Telegram, planned for release over the next few days, will allow protesters to prevent mainland Chinese and Hong Kong authorities from discovering their identities in the app’s large group chats.

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Yayoi Kusama ‘Infinity Mirrored Room’ to Go on View Permanently at Crystal Bridges Museum in Arkansas

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room—My Heart Is Dancing Into the Universe, 2018. ©YAYOI KUSAMA/COURTESY OTA FINE ARTS, TOKYO, SINGAPORE, AND SHANGHAI, AND VICTORIA MIRO, LONDON AND VENICE

Most times, when Yayoi Kusama’s “Infinity Mirrored Rooms” get shown at museums, they stay on view for several months at a time, and during their run, they get stormed with visitors. But one U.S. museum has plans to keep a Kusama installation for much longer than usual.

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